Borough mayors ask AMT to reconsider fare hikes


Summary

 The mayors of Montreal’s suburbs are asking AMT to reconsider proposed fare increases of as much as 20%.

To some borough mayors the recent decision by the AMT to re-zone train stations seems completely arbitrary. For Michel Bissonnet, the city’s point man on transit, fee hikes for some train users simply because the AMT has decided to revisit zoning is unacceptable.

“Particularly in Ville Lasalle, in Lachine, in St-Laurent, in Ahuntsic, there’s 4 stations there and the tariff is class number one.”

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The AMT wants to change the zoning classification for those sectors to class two. The reason?
The stations are more than 8 kilometers away from the city. That means users who are accustomed to paying a lower rate because they’re closer to downtown could see the cost of their monthly passes increase by 21%. An increase that some borough mayors worry will be an even bigger financial burden on their citizens.

“Just realize that it’s close to $20 per month for an adult, 12 multiplied by $20. So you’re $240 just for 1 person, so a family of four its more than five, six hundred dollars per year. It’s like another tax finally,” says Lachine mayor Claude Dauphin.

The AMT announced the changes a couple of weeks ago, now the mayors of the affected boroughs, as well as a couple who don’t even have train service in their sectors yet, are speaking out.

The borough of St-Laurent, for example, has two stations in zone two and one in zone one. That zone one station is now slated to become zone two.

“It penalizes people who can least afford it,” says St-Laurent mayor Alan de Sousa, “it penalizes students it doesn’t make any sense at all that to raise the tariffs at Montepelier touches 632 thousand people.”

People, he says, who could instead take the metro from Cote Vertu and save themselves nearly $30 a month.

Lasalle is in the same situation. They’re trying to re-zone industrial land to develop housing, that would include bus and train service.

“So in this area people will be able to, you know, to use no car at all to go to work but now we are losing this incentive to move in this area because of the big increase in price,” says Lasalle mayor Manon Barbe.

The mayors hope that by challenging the rate hike, the amt will revisit its decision. They plan on presenting their motion to city council.

 


 The mayors of Montreal’s suburbs are asking AMT to reconsider proposed fare increases of as much as 20%.

To some borough mayors the recent decision by the AMT to re-zone train stations seems completely arbitrary. For Michel Bissonnet, the city’s point man on transit, fee hikes for some train users simply because the AMT has decided to revisit zoning is unacceptable.

“Particularly in Ville Lasalle, in Lachine, in St-Laurent, in Ahuntsic, there’s 4 stations there and the tariff is class number one.”

Story continues below

杭州龙凤

The AMT wants to change the zoning classification for those sectors to class two. The reason?
The stations are more than 8 kilometers away from the city. That means users who are accustomed to paying a lower rate because they’re closer to downtown could see the cost of their monthly passes increase by 21%. An increase that some borough mayors worry will be an even bigger financial burden on their citizens.

“Just realize that it’s close to $20 per month for an adult, 12 multiplied by $20. So you’re $240 just for 1 person, so a family of four its more than five, six hundred dollars per year. It’s like another tax finally,” says Lachine mayor Claude Dauphin.

The AMT announced the changes a couple of weeks ago, now the mayors of the affected boroughs, as well as a couple who don’t even have train service in their sectors yet, are speaking out.

The borough of St-Laurent, for example, has two stations in zone two and one in zone one. That zone one station is now slated to become zone two.

“It penalizes people who can least afford it,” says St-Laurent mayor Alan de Sousa, “it penalizes students it doesn’t make any sense at all that to raise the tariffs at Montepelier touches 632 thousand people.”

People, he says, who could instead take the metro from Cote Vertu and save themselves nearly $30 a month.

Lasalle is in the same situation. They’re trying to re-zone industrial land to develop housing, that would include bus and train service.

“So in this area people will be able to, you know, to use no car at all to go to work but now we are losing this incentive to move in this area because of the big increase in price,” says Lasalle mayor Manon Barbe.

The mayors hope that by challenging the rate hike, the amt will revisit its decision. They plan on presenting their motion to city council.