Stunning book on preserving local harvest is a guide for all seasons


Summary

Just because the harvest season for locally grown fruits and vegetables is waning is no reason not to keep on canning and freezing what is on hand.

In fact, following the seasons and “putting down” the bounty of local produce can be a year-round activity for anyone who has decided to catch the trend and make it their own, says Pat Crocker, home economist, herbalist and an award-winning author of eight cookbooks.

Her latest endeavour is “Preserving: The Canning and Freezing Guide for All Seasons” (HarperCollins, $29.95, paperback).

Story continues below

HangZhou Night Net

“What if you froze a lot of last summer’s strawberry harvest and want to make it into jam for Christmas gifts?” she asks. Well, it is really a no-brainer and it frees up the freezer for other items.

Most of all, Crocker wants to catch the wave of newly minted fans of getting back to basics, especially those who are interested in preserving foods for year-round consumption.

“I am discovering people like my niece who in her 30s is raising children and is really interested in local food and preserving but was afraid because she didn’t grow up with that dynamic,” she says.

“This book demystifies the whole process.”

The guide is practical and focuses on simple but effective concepts. While following the seasons, Crocker provides easy-to-follow, accurate and thorough information on preserving everything from asparagus to winter squashes.

She covers the spectrum of canning, making jams, jellies and freezing from hot-packed fruit recipes to sensational internationally flavoured chutneys and relishes.

As a Canadian home economist who decries the lack of school studies to help students develop culinary skills, Crocker is one of many of this country’s food writers who have tried to teach the basics to a new generation of cooks.

“I find that people are canning because they want to express themselves,” she says, “or having access to farmers markets and wonderful supermarket produce they want to be creative in canning and preserving.

“They want to be able to use those preserves in other dishes as well.”

All the stunning images in the book are Crocker’s, who is also a professional photographer.

Her recipe for garlic scape pesto is the result of learning about these herbs 20 years ago. The long thin flat stalks appear through the earth long before the garlic bulbs mature.

Here is her recipe for the bountiful crop that appears in late May to mid-June. They can be found in farmers markets or in your own backyard if your grow garlic.

To preserve the scape harvest, clean them and then freeze in 250-ml (1-cup) to 500-ml (2-cup) amounts to use in soups, stews or salads during the winter months.

Garlic Scape Pesto

1 l (4 cups) roughly chopped garlic scapes

3 to 5 cloves garlic (optional)

75 ml (1/3 cup) pine nuts or sunflower seeds

75 ml (1/3 cup) shaved Parmesan cheese

250 ml (1 cup) olive oil

Sea salt, to taste

In a food processor, combine scapes, garlic, if using, and nuts and process for 30 seconds.

Add Parmesan and process for 10 seconds to blend. With the motor running, add olive oil in a steady stream through the opening in the lid until pesto reaches desired consistency. Add salt.

Scrape into a clean jar with a lid and refrigerate for up to 1 week or freeze in measured amounts for up to 6 months.

Online:

For more information on the author, visit 杭州桑拿按摩论坛杭州夜生活riversongherbals杭州夜网.


Just because the harvest season for locally grown fruits and vegetables is waning is no reason not to keep on canning and freezing what is on hand.

In fact, following the seasons and “putting down” the bounty of local produce can be a year-round activity for anyone who has decided to catch the trend and make it their own, says Pat Crocker, home economist, herbalist and an award-winning author of eight cookbooks.

Her latest endeavour is “Preserving: The Canning and Freezing Guide for All Seasons” (HarperCollins, $29.95, paperback).

Story continues below

HangZhou Night Net

“What if you froze a lot of last summer’s strawberry harvest and want to make it into jam for Christmas gifts?” she asks. Well, it is really a no-brainer and it frees up the freezer for other items.

Most of all, Crocker wants to catch the wave of newly minted fans of getting back to basics, especially those who are interested in preserving foods for year-round consumption.

“I am discovering people like my niece who in her 30s is raising children and is really interested in local food and preserving but was afraid because she didn’t grow up with that dynamic,” she says.

“This book demystifies the whole process.”

The guide is practical and focuses on simple but effective concepts. While following the seasons, Crocker provides easy-to-follow, accurate and thorough information on preserving everything from asparagus to winter squashes.

She covers the spectrum of canning, making jams, jellies and freezing from hot-packed fruit recipes to sensational internationally flavoured chutneys and relishes.

As a Canadian home economist who decries the lack of school studies to help students develop culinary skills, Crocker is one of many of this country’s food writers who have tried to teach the basics to a new generation of cooks.

“I find that people are canning because they want to express themselves,” she says, “or having access to farmers markets and wonderful supermarket produce they want to be creative in canning and preserving.

“They want to be able to use those preserves in other dishes as well.”

All the stunning images in the book are Crocker’s, who is also a professional photographer.

Her recipe for garlic scape pesto is the result of learning about these herbs 20 years ago. The long thin flat stalks appear through the earth long before the garlic bulbs mature.

Here is her recipe for the bountiful crop that appears in late May to mid-June. They can be found in farmers markets or in your own backyard if your grow garlic.

To preserve the scape harvest, clean them and then freeze in 250-ml (1-cup) to 500-ml (2-cup) amounts to use in soups, stews or salads during the winter months.

Garlic Scape Pesto

1 l (4 cups) roughly chopped garlic scapes

3 to 5 cloves garlic (optional)

75 ml (1/3 cup) pine nuts or sunflower seeds

75 ml (1/3 cup) shaved Parmesan cheese

250 ml (1 cup) olive oil

Sea salt, to taste

In a food processor, combine scapes, garlic, if using, and nuts and process for 30 seconds.

Add Parmesan and process for 10 seconds to blend. With the motor running, add olive oil in a steady stream through the opening in the lid until pesto reaches desired consistency. Add salt.

Scrape into a clean jar with a lid and refrigerate for up to 1 week or freeze in measured amounts for up to 6 months.

Online:

For more information on the author, visit 杭州桑拿按摩论坛杭州夜生活riversongherbals杭州夜网.